Monday, March 2, 2015

Timberwolves Fan 'Jiggly Boy' Welcomes Kevin Garnett Home With Topless Dance; Everyone Goes Wild


In 2003, Minnesota Timberwolves’ superfan John Sweeney showed his love for NBA star Kevin Garnett when he danced topless during a Wolves game, flaunting the initials “KG,” which had been scrawled on his body.



Last week, Sweeney -- who earned the nickname “Jiggly Boy” following his 2003 performance -- ripped off his shirt to perform the famous dance yet again. Only this time, it was to welcome his favorite player home.



On Feb. 25, Garnett played his first game for the Timberwolves after years away from the team. And there, up in the stands, was Sweeney, an improv comedian, all ready to greet him.



jiggly-boy-dance





When the camera panned to him, Sweeney first acted coy, but before long, he pulled off his shirt to reveal the words “Welcome home KG” on his body. Topless, he boogied for the crowd, with his two young sons as backup dancers.



The crowd went wild for Sweeney’s performance and it seems that Garnett was thrilled with the surprise tribute. He was filmed giving his fan a huge smile and a salute.



jiggly-boy-dance-1





"I think if you saw a fat guy with everything off, dancing with your name on his chest, I think you would pay attention to that, or at least for five seconds," Garnett told the Star Tribune after the surprise performance.






Zip-Line Through The Amazon Jungle With Google's Newest Street View Feature


SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- For its next technological trick, Google will show you what it's like to zip through trees in the Amazon jungle.



The images released Monday are the latest addition to the diverse collection of photos supplementing Google's widely used digital maps. The maps' "Street View" option mostly provides panoramic views of cities and neighborhoods photographed by car-mounted cameras, but Google also has found creative ways to depict exotic locations where there are no roads.



CLICK HERE TO ZIP-LINE THROUGH THE AMAZON!



In its latest foray into the wilderness, Google teamed up with environmental protection group Amazonas Sustainable Foundation, or FAS, to explore a remote part of an Amazon rainforest. Google Inc. lent FAS its Trekker device, a camera mounted on an apparatus originally designed to be carried like a backpack by hikers walking on trails.



FAS, though, sent the Trekker down a zip line. Google is renowned for going out on a technological limb, but even this project made the company nervous at first, said Karin Tuxen-Bettman, who oversees Google's Street View partnerships.



The setup required FAS workers to tread through the rainforest to find a place where they could string the zip line so the Trekker wouldn't bump into tree trunks and branches as it zoomed through the thick canopy. With the help of some monkeys who joined their scouting expedition, FAS workers found just enough room to erect a zip line for the Trekker's trip.



"One of the things that I love about working at Google is that if a partner comes to us with a crazy idea, we will probably try it," Tuxen-Bettman said.



Since Google developed the Trekker camera in 2012, the device has been dispatched on other unusual journeys. The Trekker went scuba diving in the Galápagos Islands to take underwater photographs of the preserve, and traveled on a dog sled in the Canadian Artic to photograph the tundra.



Google's Street View feature has raised privacy concerns through the years because its photographs have occasionally captured images of unsuspecting bystanders engaged in embarrassing activities or near places where they didn't want to be seen. Cars carrying Street View cameras also secretly vacuumed up emails and other personal information transmitted over unsecure Wi-Fi networks from 2007 to 2010, sparking outrage and legal action around the world.



Privacy issues shouldn't be an issue in any of the photography taken by the zip-lining Trekker. Birds and insects are the only visible forms of life in the pictures it took.

'How To Snog Without Getting Hogwarts': Boston University Offers 'Harry Potter'-Themed Sex-Ed Class


Boston University is teaching students about safe sex and sexual health with a little bit of help from none other than wizard extraordinaire Harry Potter.



Last week, as part of “Frisky February,” a monthlong series of sexual health-related events at the university, students were invited to participate in “Sex-Ed at Hogwarts,” an interactive, “Harry Potter”-themed class about safe sex, consent and sexual health.



“At this event, half-bloods, house-elves, and muggles alike will learn the proper way to get consent to enter one's chamber of secrets and how to snog without getting hogwarts,” said the event’s Facebook page. “We'll be casting some sensual spells in CAS room 313. Hope you can apparate there.”


















The class was the brainchild of Michelle Goode and Jamie Klufts, two graduate students who work as interns at the university’s Wellness and Prevention Services program. The duo, both avid Harry Potter fans, said that they hoped to use the magical world of the series as a launchpad to discuss important issues related to sex and sexuality.









“The goal is to use a creative lens to teach sexual health,” Klufts told the Daily Free Press. “Sexual health is often a topic that can provide a lot of discomfort, but by using Hogwarts and Harry Potter language, we hope to enlighten students and also make them more comfortable with learning about it. Additionally, it allows us to reach an audience that we may not have reached otherwise.”









According to the Boston Globe, Klufts and Goode came up with the idea for the Harry Potter-themed sex-ed class after realizing that author J.K. Rowling had missed a golden opportunity to educate her teen and young adult readers about sex when she chose to gloss over the topic in the series.









“[Sex education is] definitely a subject matter J.K. Rowling ignored in a major way,” Klufts told the Daily Free Press. “It’s highly unrealistic to believe that students of middle school and high school age aren’t thinking about sex or engaging in it, or at least coming to terms with their changing bodies and sexual health.”